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. all this, and rockets hit in the city from gaza and has dented a sense of security. a ceasefire will not necessarily bring israel could not have kept them from invading much longer. its allies did not want a ground war and with elections they decided enough for now. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt posing new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country's " -- a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> the site of weapons supplied by the u.s. bombing arabs once again means that too much american craze is something that no leader in the american -- and no leader in the arab east wants right now. this morning as negotiations reached a critical stage, they were burying the night's dead. egypt is struggling to recreate itself. >> there has been a lot of cross border violence. there is no reason to oppose a new one either. not unless there is a change. >> @ gaudette's main hospital there was no -- more support from the east. libyans in turkey helping hamas believe that history is on its side. >> eight days have help
and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin today with the middle east and continue our coverage of the conflict in gaza, hamas has fired close to 1,300 rockets into israel, many of them have been intercept bid the iron dome defense system, the israeli defense force is responding with air strikes on gaza, diplomatic efforts to secure a cease-fire have been unsuccessful so far. secretary of state hillary clinton met with prime minister netanyahu in a joint conflict the united states commitment to the israel is uncompromising. >> we came with a clear message, america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid and unwavering, that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> rose: the secretary of state travels to cairo tomorrow to take part in further negotiations, joining me now is rashid khalidi, he is the edward site professor of modern arab studies in columbia university, in washington dennis ross is with the washington institute for near east policy and a former u.s. envoy to the middle east
.s. cities and has been seen by more than 3 million people. we are glad you have joined us. our conversation with bernard and shirley kinsey coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: bernard and shirley kinsey are behind the unique art exhibit. the kinsey collection has been viewed by 3 million people in eight u.s. cities, with more on the way, beginning in 2013. the companion book to the exhibit is called "the kinsey collection." it is an honor to have you both on this program. >> good to be here. tavis: let me start with whether or not in the obama era a door has been at open for greater appreciation of african-american art. i ask that for the obvious reasons, because there ar
ignored a call by an african regional group to withdraw from the city of goma, where they took control last week. government forces have pulled back to minova, trying to regroup. meanwhile, tens of thousands of people have fled the fighting for makeshift camps in the countryside. aid workers are struggling to provide them with food, clean water, and shelter. the u.n. accuses the neighboring states of rwanda and uganda of secretly backing the rebels, a charge they deny. the estimated damage done by hurricane sandy in new york has risen again to $42 billion. governor andrew cuomo announced the new figure today. it includes $32 billion for repairs and restoration and almost $10 billion more for measures to prevent damage from the next major storm. the state, along with new york city, will ask for federal disaster aid based on the damage tally. one of the legendary bands of rock 'n' roll is marking its golden anniversary. the rolling stones celebrated 50 years last night in london, with the first of five shows in the united kingdom and the u.s. nina nannar of independent television news fi
that heralds the start of a new campaign. the bomb had been left under a seat. and predictably on a city center bus, there were many passengers. they became the many injured. the bus bombing came as they were cleaning up after a missile strike in a suburb of tel aviv. an air raid siren had saved the lives of the elderly couple who call this apartment home. bus bombings by compairosn are so terrifying because they come with no warning. this was the first such attack of its kind. this time round, only a ceasefire would give it any chance of being the last. >> woodruff: residents of gaza endured another barrage of air assaults today before the ceasefire was called. john ray of independent television news was on the ground in the territory today. >> reporter: after a week of air strikes, gaza has been pummeled by the most intense barrage yet. under the plumes of smoke and fire, there's a sports stadium israel claims is used to train terrorists. news of that terrorist attack in tel aviv was proclaimed from the minnerettes. sweets were handed out but the celebration soon gave way to worry about israe
's biggest city. surging to rescue victims under the rubble of the building demolished by a government air strike. as the opposition fighters advance slowly and relentlessly, it seems to be lashing out increasingly with air attacks, it does nothing to change the situation on the ground. and >> more than 24 hours after coming into -- the editor and now reports. >> pulling the troops and tanks back from the border, the invasion is off and the cease- fire is on. the reason, long-term, they don't feel any safer. >> we want to believe in the cease-fire, so we are pretty skeptical and scared. dr. bringing home the troops without using them warns many israelis. the government is emphasizing it won't tolerate cease-fire violations. >> i would say that they need to keep the border entirely quiet, and i won't give them a license to do after a certain level, it is nothing. >> streets that were empty are packed. they put on a victory rally, the people celebrating survival. hamas feels bolstered more strongly than ever. it meant the balance of power was changing in favor of the palestinians. but thank
is found in those cities where the city fathers built the internet for their community, just like city fathers in some places built their own electric system when the big utilities wouldn't pay any attention to them in the late 19th century. >> reporter: now all this is strong stuff. so strong that we sought out the other side: the cable industry itself. michael powell, head of the federal communications commission under president george w. bush, is now president of the national cable television association. >> many of these state-owned local utilities have often failed because of financial hardship and rarely are offering speeds that are faster or cheaper than what's provided privately. even in glasgow, kentucky the top speed is only 6 megabits per second for $36. that's hardly exceptional. it's certainly no better than what's being provided in the private market. >> reporter: where average speeds are three times as fast, claims powell and prices are falling, not rising. >> the price per megabit per second has decreased 87% since 1999. in fact in 2010, the federal communications commi
in convincing both of them to reach a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the hamas song is, we're going to bomb tel aviv. but away from politics, what about people, lives disrupted by all this? yesterday we filmed awad and his mum sabbah taking shelter in a school in gaza city. frightened, disorientated, a severely disabled boy caught up in all this. today, diplomacy had delivered. sabbah was at home with the family in atatrah. >> it's good that we're okay. i'm very happy i can't believe it, i'm shivering. that face, sabbah said, means he's feeling happy and safe, and with an arm's round from brother mahmoud, and no sound of an explosion. >> sreenivasan: in israel, reserve troops began moving away from the border with gaza. many israelis were grateful a ground operation had been averted. and a day after a bomb ripped through a bus during the tel aviv rush hour, injuring 27, israel announced it had arrested a suspect, an arab israeli man with ties to hamas. i spoke with stephanie freid, a freelance journalist in tel aviv, a shor
be able to go back to their community for their city. they may not be able to go back to their families. their immediate family may never be able to visit them because someone might be lying in wait for them. trial is over,s her ordeal is not. >> he has received two oscars, founded his own film festival, and maybe even have been -- and has been awarded a french knighthood. now, robert redford has spoken out. the impact of climate change is gaining new attention. will it spur action? recently, we sat down with him and los angeles to hear why he is taking up this cause. >> of hollywood legend is one of the most vocal conservationists. he told me that an obama second term offers hope for the planet but his native southern california is not what used to be. >> i grew up in los angeles at a time and was a very beautiful city. it was just at the end of the second world war and there was spaces in between the communities. there was spaces and the spaces or green. the air was fresh and clean. all of which we took for granted. pavement and concrete and skyscrapers were being developed and the sp
trouble. >> right here in river city. >> right here in river city. >> with a capital t and that rhymes with p and that stands for pool. >> ♪ that stands for pool. >> we've surely got trouble. >> ♪ we've surely got trouble. ♪ >> right here in river city. >> ♪ right here. >> ♪ remember the maine, plymouth rock, and the golden rule ♪ our children's children gonna have trouble. ♪ >> well, you've got trouble. we're in terrible, terrible trouble. ♪ that game with the 15 numbered balls is the devil's tool ♪ devil's tool ♪ we've surely got trouble, trouble, trouble ♪ oh, yes, we got trouble here we got great big trouble. ♪ >> with a t. >> ♪ with a capital t. >> got to rhyme it with p. >> ♪ that rhymes with p. >> and that stands for pool! holy crap, holy crap. i was performing on a broadway stage for the first time, so it feels pretty frickin' good. and the audience is awesome and they're feeling it. >> i learned to contain my fear, because all the people around me didn't show their fear. so, i mean, obviously everybody's scared, but i think there's a point where if
's flagship store in new york city. it's also investing in technology to beef up it's online presence. "n.b.r.'s" ruben ramirez caught up with macy's c.e.o. terry lundgren in new york this morning and began by asking him how sales are going. both in store and on-line. >> they're both growing and that's the good news for us and while the online business has been spectacular for macy's for several years, we really look at the consumer as an omnichannel consumer. so she comes in, she does her research on her phone. she decides what store she wants to shop. what items she wants to shop for. maybe going back to her desk and pulling the trigger there. so i think that's what happening today. so the line between online and physical stores is blurred. >> reporter: the past several years consumers have opened their wallets around the holidays but come january it seemed that that optimism faded. what are you expecting come january 2013? >> we've had 11 consecutive quarters of consistent growth of sales and earnings at macy's inc. we've found the formula. a lot of retailers depend on january to be a
of early r&b vocal groups that began to cross over into the culture of the big cities and helped us identify ourselves in the process. [applause] and now... thank you. and now the capitol recording stars, the singing five keys! ♪ ♪ i sa mok em boo di ay ♪ i sa mok em boo ♪ i went to china town ♪ way back in old hong kong ♪ took out some egg foo yung ♪ and then i heard a gong ♪ ling, ting, tong, tried to sing that song called ♪ ♪ i sa mok em boo di ay, i sa mok em boo ♪ we were the first rock-and-roll generation. before us, the kids had to listen to what their parents listened to, the big band. nothing wrong with the big band, but it's the first time the kid had his own music. ♪ and as i looked around ♪ the lights were going down ♪ and this is what i found ♪ a ling, ting, tong, tried to sing that song ♪ ♪ called i so mok em boo di ay, i so mok em boo ♪ bobby jay: there was a new market coming along that no one yet identified or targeted, the teenager. they were always there. in the '40s with sinatra they were called bobbysoxers. they didn't want to
hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown
of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i think does not do justice to the reality at the time and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. >> sreenivasan: graham, along with senators mccain and ayotte, have said they'll oppose rice if she's nominated to be secretary of state. but independent senator joe lieberman also met with rice today, and he said he was satisfied with her explanation of events. >> i found her statements to be significant. she was jus
like antiques, so she suggested we go to nevada city, take a little trip, and do some antiquing and have a nice breakfast. and i found this little cradle in an antiques shop. and i love the tin lithography, and also that it has a little dog on it. i'm a dog lover. uh-huh, uh-huh. the price was right, so i decided to buy it. well, what was the price? thirty-two dollars. and how long ago was this? a little over a year ago. wow. well, it is a cradle, and it's a lithograph tin. you have beautiful lithography. lithograph tin started coming into play in the very late part of the 19th and the early part of the 20th century. these are kleinert's waterproof baby pants. and of course it's an advertising piece. it's also a point-of-purchase display piece. that's what they call when they put something right near the cash register. and it would entice people to buy it. oh, okay. and i'm sure that they had the little baby pants here inside the cradle with a picture of the little baby in his waterproof pants to advertise the item. and it actually rocks. it's absolutely a charming thing. now, i
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we are at the supreme court of the united states in washington, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal
! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. >> uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff
/schiller home price index. the survey tracks 20 metropolitan cities, and shows home prices were up 3% year over year in september. compared to august, prices inched up three-tenths percent higher. together, analysts say the numbers add up to a long recovery for housing. >> the housing market has clearly turned the corner and is well on its way to recovery. it's going to be a slow, steady, recovery rather than a booming, explosive recovery, because we still have a few years of distressed inventory we have to work through and some headwinds in the lending market. >> tom: nationally, prices are back to their mid-2003 levels. but they're still down 30% from the peak of the housing bubble. >> susie: last summer's drought fried much of the nation's corn crop, but it didn't scorch interest in owning farmland. in many parts of the corn belt, farmland values jumped 13% over the past three months, according to the chicago federal reserve bank. as diane eastabrook reports, a growing number of investors from pension funds to mutual funds are making farms a hot commodity. >> reporter: to a small but growing
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> tonight we continue to exploring our brain with the conversation about pain. pain serves a very important function for us to survive, it teaches us what to avoid and lets us know when to seek medical help. at the same time, though it can create tremendous suffering. st. augustine once said the greatest evil is physical pain, 100 million americans live with it every day would yo would wouo doubt agree, pain knows no boundaries, regardless of age and race, beyond the physical symptoms the experience of chronic pain often leads to feelings of isolation and hopelessness. >> laura klein had been living with pain since a knee injury in 2008 and joins me this evening to speak about her experiences and incredible group of scientists are also here to discuss how we perceive and process pain, david bar stiewk of children's hospital and david julius of the university of california, san francisco, allan basbaum, also of the university of california san francisco, robert dworkin of the university of rocheste
york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we want to talk about facebook, social media and the digital revolution. ken auletta is here, he writes for the "new yorker" magazine. his column "the annals of communication" extensively covers the tech giants of silicon valley. in july he wrote a profile of sheryl sandberg called "a woman's place: can sheryl sandberg upend silicon valley's male-dominated culture?" tonight we'll look at where facebook stands, the recovery from the highly disappointing i.p.o., the move towards mobile technology, the enduring concerns about privacy and the competition with google. i am pleased to have ken auletta back at this table to talk about that before we show you an interview i did with sheryl sandberg and marc andreessen who's on the board of facebook. we begin with this question, though. where is facebook today after all the controversy about that i.p.o. >> they're in a very strong position. they've got over a billion users in the world. that -- two months ago it was 900 million users in the world. so they're growing. and they're not yet in china and oth
our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: j.k. rowling is here, if you do not know who she is let me tell you, two decades ago she sat on a delayed train when the image of a scrawny black haired be spectacled boy who didn't know he was a wizard came to her, it soon captured the imagination of readers around the world and began and unprecedented full comurl phenomenon, time magazine credited harry potter series with creating a universal detail to detailed and believable that an entire generation has pretty much chosen to live there. it is a best selling book series in history with more than 450 million copies sold, and six, in 67 languages, eight movies have also been spawned and they have grossed $7.7 billion worldwide. now, five years after laying harry pot tore rest, she has written her first book for adults, it is called the casual vacancy, i am pleased to have j.k. rowling at this table for the first time, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: i have been waiting for you. >> really? good. nice to hear. >> how much trepidation did you have after you decided
of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and f
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)